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09-29-2016

Clarkson University Researchers Publish Paper on Leukemia Stem Cell Study

Clarkson University graduate students working together with Clarkson Trustee Dr. Bayard D. Clarkson Sr. of Sloan-Kettering Institute have published a paper on leukemia research in Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine.

NanomedicineThe paper, "Biophysical differences between chronic myelogenous leukemic quiescent and proliferating stem/progenitor cells," was authored by then-students Natalia V. Guz, Ph.D. in physics (currently post-doctoral researcher at Clarkson University);  Sapan Patel, Ph.D. in chemistry (currently a post-doctoral researcher at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory); and post-doctoral researcher Maxim E. Dokukin (currently post-doctoral researcher at Tufts University); in collaboration with Bayard D. Clarkson Sr. of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; and Clarkson Professor of Physics Igor Sokolov (currently Professor of Mechanical Engineering in Tufts University).

The treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a clonal myeloproliferative disorder, has improved recently, but most patients have not yet been cured. Some patients develop resistance to the available treatments.

"The researchers examined samples of leukemia stem cells using an atomic force microscope to determine unknown biophysical differences between quiescent and proliferating cells: cell hardness, surface type, pericellular brush length and its grafting density at the single cell level. Because some cells are denser and have denser pericellular brush than others, the team wanted to test these differences between quiescent -- or dormant -- stem cells and proliferated ones.

"Some cases of leukemia can be treated with chemicals, but some cells become dormant, and the treatment then kills the proliferated cells, but not the dormant cells," Guz said.

However, the "dormant cells can 'wake up' and then proliferate." Once cells proliferate, the leukemia returns. Guz said the research on quiescent cells is important to better understand how and when these cells "wake up" so they can be removed from the patient’s body.

"Dr. Clarkson, a world renowned expert in leukemia research, was very eager to examine different and innovative methods not commonly used today," she said. "This collaboration was a wonderful and productive experience."

Read the article at http://www.nanomedjournal.com/article/S1549-9634%2816%2930089-2/abstract .

Clarkson University educates the leaders of the global economy. One in five alumni already leads as an owner, CEO, VP or equivalent senior executive of a company. With its main campus located in Potsdam, N.Y., and additional graduate program and research facilities in the Capital Region and Beacon, New York, Clarkson is a nationally recognized research university with signature areas of academic excellence and research directed toward the world's pressing issues. Through more than 50 rigorous programs of study in engineering, business, arts, education, sciences and the health professions, the entire learning-living community spans boundaries across disciplines, nations and cultures to build powers of observation, challenge the status quo, and connect discovery and innovation with enterprise.

Photo caption: Clarkson University graduate students working together with Clarkson Trustee Dr. Bayard D. Clarkson Sr. of Sloan-Kettering Institute have published a paper on leukemia research in Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. The researchers examined samples of leukemia stem cells using an atomic force microscope to determine unknown biophysical differences between quiescent and proliferating cells.

[Photograph for media use is available at http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/nanomedicine.jpg ]

[News directors and editors: For more information, contact Annie Harrison, Director of Media Relations, at 315-268-6764 or aharrison@clarkson.edu.]

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