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Keynote and Breakouts

In this Section

Clarkson University Department of Occupational Therapy is an approved continuing education provider of the American Occupational Therapy Association, and it's Physical Therapy Department is approved by NYPTA to provide continuing education.  Attendees will receive a certificate of attendance for all sessions completed in their entirety, up to 10 contact hours or 1.0 CEU.

The intended audience for this conference includes occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech language pathologists, special education teachers, rehabilitation engineers, health care providers or anyone interested in learning more about the use of assistive technology to promote function, participation and engagement.  In addition, individuals with disabilities, their family members or caregivers may also benefit from the content of these sessions.

As required by AOTA, each session is classified as Introductory, Intermediate or Advanced.  In addition, a classification code identifies the content as related to the Domain of OT, Occupational Therapy Process, or Professional Issues.
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The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.
                                                                                                                                                                   KEYNOTE PRESENTATION BY JOHN LANCASTER


lancasterJohn Lancaster serves as the Secretary/Treasurer and a Board Member of Tri-Lakes Center for Independent Living (TLCIL).  The Tri-Lakes Center for Independent Living (TLCIL) works to improve the quality of life for residents with disabilities in Franklin and Essex Counties of northern New York. TLCIL is a community-based, cross-disability, non-profit organization that is operated primarily by people with disabilities. TLCIL operates according to a philosophy of consumer control, wherein people with all types of disabilities are directly involved in governance and staff.  TLCIL provides peer counseling, information and referral, independent living skills training, and individual and systems advocacy.

Mr. Lancaster retired as the Executive Director of the National Council on Independent Living in May 2009.  NCIL represents disability grassroots organizations run by and for people with disabilities.  NCIL advances the independent living philosophy and advocates for the full integration and participation of people with disabilities in society.
In 2011, President Barack Obama appointed and the United States Senate confirmed Mr. Lancaster to the Board of Directors of the United States Institute of Peace.
Until recently, he served as the Treasurer and Member of the Board of Trustees for the Handicap International Federation.  HI works to improve the rights and conditions of people living in disabling situations in post-conflict, post-disaster and low-income countries around the world.

He has long been active in the development of the human and civil rights of people with disabilities throughout the world.  He served as a representative for disability employment policy in discussions between the European Union and the United States under the New Trans-Atlantic Agenda.  From 2000 – 2004, he served as a policy advisor to the Vietnamese Government and the US Agency for International Development in developing disability law, policy and programs in Viet Nam.  He served on the Board of the United States International Council on Disabilities and assisted in advocating for the ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Mr. Lancaster is a native of the Hamburg, New York.  He graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1967 with a B.A. in the General Program of Liberal Studies.  As a Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps, he commanded an infantry platoon in combat during the Vietnam War earning a Purple Heart and Bronze Star in 1968.  Following military service, he returned to the University of Notre Dame for a law degree.

Since 1974, he has worked as a civil rights attorney on issues related to the integration and empowerment of people with disabilities.  He has served in government from 1981-1987 for Governor Harry Hughes of Maryland as the Director of the Office for Individuals with Disabilities and again from 1991-2000 with the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities.  From 1995-2000, he distinguished himself in the Clinton Administration in the formulation of disability employment policy as the President’s Committee’s Executive Director.
He and his wife of 33 years, Christine Lancaster, reside in Potsdam, New York.

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION BY JOHN LANCASTER

“Advocacy and Activism: Paving the Way for Opportunity”
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to describe common barriers to successful participation in education, work, or community life for individuals with disabilities.
2.  Participants will be able to describe at least three strategies or approaches that they can use to effectively advocate for their own or their clients' needs.

NCAT DISTINGUISHED LECTURER: John Domiao

A.T. and the Maker Movement: Tools for Measuring Outcomes
John Damiao, MS, OTR/L, Dominican College
Session Description: John is an occupational therapist who specializes in powered mobility and complex seating and mobility systems. He is certified by RESNA as an Assistive Technology Professional and Seating & Mobility Specialist, and is a full time faculty in the Dominican College Occupational Therapy Graduate Program.  In addition, John serves as a consultant at The Center for Discovery, where he is the lead designer on the IndieGo project. The IndieGo is an open source, add-on device that can convert any manual wheelchair to a power wheelchair at a fraction of the cost.  John and his project team were recently awarded a $1.125 million dollar grant to further their IndieGo development. In addition, he is the lead researcher on a Hearst Foundation Grant exploring “smart” wheelchair technology. John is currently pursuing his PhD in Health Related Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University.  John’s presentation will explore the connections between innovation, evidence, and meaningful outcomes.
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to define the maker movement philosophy as it relates to assistive technology.
2.  Participants will be able to describe how tools and technology can be used to measure client participation.
3.  Participants will be able to synthesize the role health care providers can play in improving outcomes-based intervention and evidence-based practice through the use of technology.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS:

A Personal Perspective on Assistive Technology
Pamela Charleson, MSED
SUNY Potsdam
Session Description:  This session is intended to educate individuals about AT devices that can support various aspects of daily life, and in turn, promote increased independence. The session will include showing a variety of assistive technology devices, ranging from low-tech to high-tech, that are used by individuals with physical disabilities.  The devices can be used across environments, work, school, home, etc. to help make the individual more independent in their activities of daily living.  Participants will engage in conversation regarding proper etiquette for a variety of disabilities and how society and its members should treat individuals with disabilities.  In addition, a variety of books, ranging in age level from pre-k through adulthood will be discussed for teachers and therapists to use to educate others about disabilities.  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 1 Domain; Introductory Level)

Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to list and describe at least 3 AT devices, ranging from low- to high-tech, that can be used by individuals with physical disabilities to support everyday life.
2.  Participants will describe proper etiquette and language to use when interacting with individuals with disabilities.
3.  Participants will be able to list at least 3 educational books and/or resources that can be used to increase awareness and understanding for a variety of disabilities.

Chromebooks, iPads & Desktops - Cross-Platform Writing Support with Clicker
Toni Cagginao, Educational Sales Consultant
Crick Software, Inc.
Session Description: All teachers face the challenge of helping the diverse learners in their classroom develop and improve their writing skills, and educational technology is a valuable tool to help with that challenge. While most teachers welcome the use of technology to support students’ writing, many are working in schools with a selection of different computers and devices which can create an additional challenge for teachers and students. In this session we’ll demonstrate how Clicker 7 and Clicker Apps address both of these issues by providing innovative writing tools that work across a range of platforms - Chromebooks, iPads, and desktop computers. By giving students differentiated support, Clicker 7 and Clicker Apps are able to engage and motivate all writers, including English language learners and students with specific special educational needs. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate Level)
Learning Objectives:  
1.  Participants will recognize 5 benefits of Clicker and Clicker Apps as an innovative cross-platform writing solution.
2.  Participants will identify 3 ways that Clicker resources can be differentiated in order to positively impact teaching and learning.
3.  Participants will explain 3 ways to create activities that provide access to the curriculum for students with specific educational needs.

Keys to Successful Decision Making in AAC: No-tech to high-tech, and How to Avoid System Abandonment
Ashley Couture, MS, CCC-SLP
University of Vermont Medical Center
Session Description: With the rapid advancement of technology and easier access to it, more and more clients are coming to us as practitioners requesting certain technology for communication.  The greater exposure of many people to the internet and advertising has increased awareness and interest in certain communication technologies over others.  However, without comprehensive assessment including feature matching between a client and an AAC system as well as exploration of their communication needs and motivations, we risk at the least system abandonment and at the most creating avoidance behavior because something is too difficult or doesn’t allow them to meet their communication needs. This session will present strategies for comprehensive assessment of AAC from no tech to high tech as well as models for intervention that maximize the chances of our clients have effective and flexible augmentative alternative communication that they will USE!  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to state at least 3 important features of a consumer and an AAC system to be assessed and matched during the evaluation process.
2.  Participants will be able to give at least 2 practical examples of how one can combine low-tech and high-tech AAC tools to increase flexibility and minimize risk of abandonment for a consumer.
3.  Participants will be able to list and describe at least 3 tools for assessment and intervention for AAC that will minimize risk of abandonment.

Using Powerful Teaching and Assistive Technology to Support Secondary Learners with Disabilities in Reading and Writing
Amanda Fenlon, Ed.D; Bailey Woodard, BS; Kelsey Wilson, BS
SUNY Oswego
Session Description: The Common Core Curriculum standards have increased expectations for ALL students in the areas of ELA and writing. Secondary students with disabilities often struggle with reading, organizing thoughts and completing writing assignments, yet need authentic access to the general education curriculum.  Assistive technology can help level the playing field for students with disabilities and allow them to flourish in reading and writing assignments. It can help them access grade level curriculum. One of the roles of effective special educators is to provide explicit instruction combined with “just right” assistive technology tools to help students with disabilities succeed in writing. The plethora of assistive technology tools can be overwhelming for busy teachers. According to the Council for Exceptional Children’s newly revised Professional Ethics and Standards (2015), special educators must be knowledgeable about assistive technology tools that can increase the achievement of their diverse students with disabilities. This session will offer descriptions and applications of commonly used assistive technology tools (Google Chrome extensions and APPS, iPads, WriteOnline, etc.).  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to describe 3-5 assistive technology tools that are available for reading and writing support for students with disabilities at the secondary level.
2.  Participants will be able to list 4 considerations, strategies or methods that enhance reading and writing instruction for secondary students with disabilities.
3.  Participants will be able to describe the process of matching assistive technology tools that would best suit individual students’ needs, considering various disabilities/challenges in reading and writing.

Establishing an Assistive Technology Center
Dawn Hameline, OTR/L, ATP; Sharon Hallman, DPT, ATP; Ashley Couture, CCC/SLP
University of Vermont Medical Center
Session Description: The field of AT provides many opportunities for a multidisciplinary approach.  Here at UVM Medical Center,  OT, PT, SLP and community agencies are collaborating to establish an Assistive Technology Clinic with the goals of providing effective service delivery, efficient access and improved client satisfaction for individuals with complex assistive technology needs.  We have spent the last 2 years reviewing and improving upon our AT service delivery process.  This presentation will outline the process we used and the model we developed for a multidisciplinary assistive technology clinic.   We will include the literature reviewed,  needs assessment process, survey of existing models, partnerships formed, outcome measures evaluated, plans for remaining current with changing technology, resources developed and lessons learned. Our target audience includes clinicians working in the area of Assistive Technology. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will identify at least 2 strategies that can be used to develop an effective collaborative/community AT program.
2.  Participants will identify 3 critical considerations when scheduling a client for an AT evaluation.
3.  Participants will list 3 different outcome measures to consider when completing an AT evaluation.
Participants will be able to discuss 2 advantages to establishing relationships with community resources.

Sport as an Extension of Rehab
Dawn Hameline, OTR/L, ATP
University of Vermont Medical Center
Session Description: Participation in sports and recreation is fun and good for you.  For many of us it defines who we are: a tennis player, a goalie, or a runner.  Following a life changing injury or illness, many people lose the ability to participate the way they once did, putting them at greater risk for the development of physical and mental health problems.  Returning to sport should be part of the rehab continuum. In this 60 minute presentation I will discuss the health benefits of participation in sport.  We will look at the roles of clinicians in the selection and modification of adapted sporting equipment and we will discuss examples of equipment and characteristics.  This is an introductory course geared for individuals who are new to adapted sport and sporting equipment.  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process, Introductory)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will identify at least 3 resources in their own communities for facilitating participation in adapted sport.
2.  Participants will list 3 sports that could be pursued by someone with tetriplegia.
3.  Participants will identify 3 health benefits for someone post injury/illness returning to sport.

Read & Write Google Extension
Lee Kyler, M.Ed.
Tupper Lake Central School District
Session Description: Read & Write for Google Chrome is an all in one application for use in any classroom. This application combines features from paid services for a much lower cost. These features include text to speech, dictation, word prediction, picture and talking dictionary, notecards and highlighting for research purposes, and much more. Participants are encouraged to bring their own Chromebook or other device for this interactive, hands-on exploration of the Read & Write features. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process, Introductory)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be familiar with Read & Write Extension and be able to describe the program capabilities.
2.  Participants will utilize Read & Write to create at least one practical classroom activity.
3.  Participants will discuss at least 3 examples of potential implications for classroom, district or work setting implementation.

Modifying a Home to Promote Independence and Healthy Lifestyles for People on the Autism Spectrum
Stephanie Rauscher, PTA, ATP, Certificate in Home Modifications
United Cerebral Palsy; Dwell in Place
Session Description: Living with people who are on the autism spectrum can be a stressful experience.  But it doesn't always have to be.  There are many areas in a home environment that can be adapted to make it a happy home where independence is nurtured and lifestyles are healthy….a home to work, play learn and live in.  Not only do children need to learn to adapt to the environment  but  you also need to shape the environment to stimulate or calm, provide order, encourage interests, talents and successes and to give and maintain control to parents or caregivers.  Areas addressed in this presentation will include: space to eat, space to sleep, space to work, space for life skills, color, clutter, visual/auditory/proprioceptive input, home safety, elopement ,attitude and assistive technology devices that will support learning, playing and day to day living. Intended audience: parents,  caregivers, people with autism, therapists, teachers, family members and any other professional or person with an interest in home environment. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will list 3 modifications that can be made to a home to address auditory, visual, and proprioceptive sensitivities.
2.  Participants will list 3 ways that the home environment can be modified to improve safety for individuals on the autism spectrum.
3.  Participants will list 5 AT devices that can be used to enhance communication, cognition, sensory input and recreation at home.

Facilitating Literacy Learning in Students with Complex Communication Needs (CCNs)
Dr. James Feeney, PhD, CCC-SLP
The College of St. Rose
Session Description: This 90 minute presentation will offer participants a review of key terms and concepts associated with an integrated approach to literacy learning in individuals with CCN. Audience members will also be provided with a brief review evidence-based practices in literacy instruction for students with CCN.  A discussion of common concerns associated with instruction in the areas of reading and writing with individuals with CCN will be provided and video illustrations of students with CCN engaging in literacy learning activities with teachers, helping professionals, and peers will be used to highlight critical components of an integrated approach to literacy learning within a  Vygotskyan framework for teaching and learning. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to describe key terms and concepts associated with an integrated approach to literacy learning in individuals with CCN.
2.  Participants will be able to describe a range of evidence-based practices in literacy instruction for students with CCN.
3.  Participants will be able to identify at least three ways to apply concepts associated with integrated literacy instruction with individuals with CCN across service delivery settings. 

Get Back Out There - Returning a Wheelchair-bound Individual to the Outdoors
Richard Fabend, MS Special Ed
HandiHelp
Session Description: Being confined to a wheelchair is no reason to stop enjoying outdoor activities which bring one quality of life. Many pieces of adaptive equipment can be produced by the individual, a friend, skilled artisans in the local community or purchased online. While the challenges may seem overwhelming at first, they can be overcome by thought, commitment and trial and error. This workshop will discuss the modification process which can be used which will allow an individual to garden, kayak and fish to mention a few. This workshop is designed for therapists who will be working with individuals in wheelchairs.  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives: 
1.  Participants will be able to identify five key concepts to consider when developing adaptive equipment.
2.  Participants will be able to explain how understanding the unique abilities of the individual can ensure a good fit in the equipment adaptation process.
3.  Participants will be able to provide a rationale for and describe the ongoing process of equipment adaptation.

Assistive Technology and Work-Based Learning
Candy Tavernier, M.Ed, Transition Specialist, Capital District/North Country RSE-TASC
Letah Graff, MS Rehab Counseling, Berkshire Union School District
Session Description: When students are given the opportunity to participate in Work Based Learning Experiences, their needs with respect to AT may change.  It is critical that we are assessing the AT  needs of students, documenting the needs and teaching students how to advocate for their needs when they are on the worksite.  This session will focus on assessment process, documentation in the IEP and Employabilty Profile. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to list the steps of the SETT process.
2.  Participants will be able to identify three places in the IEP where AT/ WBL considerations should be documented.
3.  Participants will be able to list two ways to use the Employability Profile to facilitate the use of AT in school and out of school.

Breakout EDU - Assistive Technology Style
Justin Andre, M.Ed., Lowville Academy
Misty Moshier, M.Ed., Lowville Academy
Session Description:  Breakout EDU allows for the facilitation of games where players use teamwork and critical thinking to solve a series of challenging puzzles in order to open the locked box.  In this interactive, hands-on presentation for teachers, therapists, parents and administrators, participants will be split into teams.  Each team will be given 45 minutes to solve a series of puzzles related to Assistive Technology in order to open their box.  Prizes will be awarded to the team that finishes first.  Once teams have completed, the group will reassemble and discuss ways this instruction strategy can be adapted and modified to meet the needs of various learners.  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process, Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to describe the steps required to "open the locked box" in Breakout EDU.
2.  Participants will be able to provide at least 3 general examples of ways to adapt and modify Breakout EDU to meet the needs of diverse learners.
3.  Participants will be able to develop at least one specific, practical application of Breakout EDU to meet the educational needs of their students, clients, support staff or colleagues within their own practice setting.

Don’t Throw Out Your Old iPod Touch! The Secret to Making Your Old Technology Worth Big Money in the Classroom
Patricia Gardner, Special Education Teacher/Technology Integration Specialist
Town of Webb UFSD
Session Description: This interactive session will focus on strategies for utilizing existing technology such as iPhones or iPods to capitalize on speech-to-text capabilities to support students through differentiated instruction. What happens when an interpreter is unable to come to school? Students can use speech-to-text to "hear" what is going on in class through real time captioning.  How can students who are dependent on 1:1 assistance for note-taking become more independent learners? By using speech-to-text with existing technology! Our AT Team has addressed these and similar challenges by identifying how these existing low-cost tools can save time for staff and foster independence for students with minimal disruption in the classroom. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Domain; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to identify all hardware/software needed to make speech to text instant class notes for a variety of student needs.
2.  Participants will identify an app that is required within the Google domain to make classnotes accessible in a regular education classroom.
3.  Participants will be able to identify an individual who would benefit from utilizing this type of technology.

What’s Next? Capitalizing on Agencies, Resources and Assistive Technology to Support Vocational and Higher Education Pursuits
Kathy Wilcox, Transition & Youth Services Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, ACCES-VR
Beatrice Beguin, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, New York State Commission for the Blind
Kathy Scott, Program Coordinator, Adirondack Regional Technology Center (TRAID)
Lisa Tebo, Clarkson University Occupational Therapy Department
Session Description: Whether pursuing a degree, entering the workforce for the first time, or returning to work after an injury or illness, having access to the right information, tools and support can significantly increase the potential for success among individuals with disabilities. This interactive, two-part presentation will examine the resources and programs available to assist individuals in New York, as well as explore some of the current technologies that are available to promote independence in both work and educational settings.  In Part A, participants will learn about both current and new initiatives through Adult Career and Continuing Educational Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) and the New York State Commission for the Blind, as well as the Interagency Council on Transition. The role of AT in this transition process will be discussed.  Part B will focus on assistive technology resources and tools that can be instrumental in this process. Participants will learn about the NY State TRAID program and it's commitment to promoting successful AT use through the dissemination of information, device demonstration, and device loans. Finally, selected AT to support higher education and vocational performance will be demonstrated and discussed. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to describe the eligibility requirements, application process and services available through New York's ACCES-VR and Commission for the Blind.
2.  Participants will be able to describe the Interagency Council on Transition and state how it can benefit each of its partners.
3.  Participants will be able to describe the NY State TRAID Program, identify at least 3 ways it can benefit AT consumers and service providers, and be able to locate their regional TRAID center.
4.  Participants will become familiar with at least 4 new AT tools that can support an individual in an educational and/or vocational setting.

3D Printing: An Exploration of an Emerging Technology Tool for Rehab
Victoria Priganc, PhD, Clarkson University Occupational Therapy Department
Narisha Samsundar, OTS, Clarkson University Occupational Therapy Department
Jennifer Longwell, OTS, Clarkson University Occupational Therapy Department
Christopher Diaz, Clarkson University Engineering Program
Session Description:  Advances in technology are occurring everyday, resulting in new and creative ways to address the needs of clients.  Faculty and students from the Clarkson University Occupational Therapy and Engineering Programs have begun preliminary exploration of 3D printing, as well as its potential applications for both clinicians and clients.  In this presentation, we will provide an overview of current 3D printing uses in healthcare, share our initial experiences delving into this field, and invite participants to explore ways in which 3D printing may be used to meet unmet client needs now and in the future. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to list and describe at least three ways that 3D printing could be utilized in their practice setting.
2.  Participants will be able to describe the basic process of 3D printing using existing 3D files.
3.  Participants will identify at least one practical application of 3D printing for a client(s) they serve.

Poster Session: Assistive Technology to Promote Recreation and Community Mobility
Eric Snyder, Amanpreet Gill, Brittany Hawley, Jennifer Longwell, Heidi Meramo, Kirsten Walkland; Clarkson University OT Students
Faculty advisor: Lisa Tebo, OTD, OTR/L, ATP
Clarkson University Department of Occupational Therapy
Session Description: Students in the Clarkson University Occupational Therapy Program explored assistive technologies that can be utilized by individuals with a variety of conditions to support participation in their communities through driving, mobility and recreation.  Each poster includes a general overview of a type of AT, the population(s) it can support, ways in which the AT can promote participation, health and wellness, and a comparison to other similar products.  In addition, the students reviewed the literature to identify evidence supporting or justifying the use of these technologies.  Topics included in this poster session include:
Low-tech Adaptations for Driving (Eric Snyder)
Independent Driving Through Mid- to High-tech Adaptations (Amanpreet Gill)
SmartDrive: AT Promoting Independence Among Manual Wheelchair Users (Brittany Hawley)
Water Sport Assistive Technology: Supporting Participation in Recreation and Fitness (Jennifer Longwell)
AT for Leisure and Recreation: Adaptive Alpine Skiing (Heidi Meramo)
Adaptive Sports: Sled Hockey (Kirsten Walkland)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to give at least 5 examples of AT that can be used to promote community participation in meaningful activities.
2.  Participants will be able to describe a rationale for using assistive technologies to support participation in meaningful activities based on evidence in the literature.
3.  Participants will be able to identify at least one AT tool that would be appropriate for an individual they work with and describe how it could be beneficial.

Poster Session: Assistive Technology for Daily Living
Dustin Brown, Yessica Moronta, Ramona Nadres, Nette Schulze, Emma Rosenthal, Tiffany Sha;
Clarkson OT Students
Faculty Advisor: Lisa Tebo, OTD, OTR/L, ATP
Session Description:  Students in the Clarkson University Occupational Therapy Program explored assistive technologies that can be utilized by individuals with a variety of conditions to support independent, safe and healthy participation in meaningful activities during daily life .  Each poster includes a general overview of a type of AT, the population(s) it can support, ways in which the AT can promote participation, health and wellness, and a comparison to other similar products.  In addition, the students reviewed the literature to identify evidence supporting or justifying the use of these technologies.  Topics included in this poster session include:
Supports for Medication Management (Dustin Brown)
Assistive Technology to Support Safe Cooking (Yessica Moronta)
Assistive Technology for Bathing: Promoting Safety in Aging in Place (Ramona Nadres)
Utilizing SmartPhone Apps to Increase Quality of Sleep (Nette Schulze)
Ergonomic Keyboards (Emma Rosenthal)
Finding the Best Fit: Ergonomic Chairs (Tiffany Sha)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to give at least 5 examples of AT that can be used to promote safe and healthy participation in daily activities at home and work.
2.  Participants will be able to describe a rationale for using assistive technologies to support participation in meaningful activities based on evidence in the literature.
3.  Participants will be able to identify at least one AT tool that would be appropriate for an individual they work with and describe how it could be beneficial.

Poster Session: Assistive Technology to Promote Access to Participation
Sierra Caramia, Tyler Metroff, Maraya VanBrocklin, Maria Smith, Kayla Lowman
Clarkson OT Students
Faculty Advisor: Lisa Tebo, OTD, OTR/L, ATP
Clarkson University Department of Occupational Therapy
Session Description: Students in the Clarkson University Occupational Therapy Program explored assistive technologies that can be used by individuals with a variety of conditions to access and engage in meaningful activities through alternate methods.  Each poster includes a general overview of a type of AT, the population(s) it can support, ways in which the AT can promote participation, health and wellness, and a comparison to other similar products.  In addition, the students reviewed the literature to identify evidence supporting or justifying the use of these technologies.  Topics included in this poster session include:
High-Tech Communication Devices (Sierra Caramia)
EyeGaze Assistive Technology: Tobii PCEye Mini (Tyler Metroff)
Mid-tech Text-to-Speech Applications (Maraya VanBrocklin)
OS Accessibility for Low Vision: Chrome OS, Mac OS, and Windows 10 (Kayla Lowman)
Electronic Pens: Supports for Executive Functioning and Other Populations (Maria Smith)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to give at least 5 examples of AT that can be used to provide alternate methods to access and participate in meaningful activities.
2.  Participants will be able to describe a rationale for using assistive technologies to support participation in meaningful activities based on evidence in the literature.
3.  Participants will be able to identify at least one AT tool that would be appropriate for an individual they work with and describe how it could be beneficial.

Utilizing Website Building to Develop Transition Readiness and Self-Advocacy with Youth
David Merlo, MS, COTA, CPRP; OTA Program Director, Bryant & Stratton College
Sharon Cavanaugh, OTR/L, Director of WAY Program, Baker Victory Services
Session Description:  The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act states that transition planning must be based on the “individual student's needs, taking into account the student's preferences and interests." However, students diagnosed with “Emotional and Behavioral” conditions oftentimes have not had sufficient opportunity to develop essential self-awareness, environmental awareness, and commitment – all necessary rehabilitation readiness attributes to be active and empowered participants in the transition process. Web-WAY is a unique occupational therapy intervention
intended to empower and equip transition-age youth with emotional disabilities with the knowledge and resources to take command of their own transition plan and process. The process of creating web-based portfolios results in increased self-awareness, environmental-awareness, self-advocacy, communication, and technology competencies. Resultant digital portfolios provide tangible and graphic presentations of students’ attributes, goals, and accomplishments. This presentation will showcase stories of kids who are web masters – passionate creators of dynamic websites about themselves - and their amazing websites. You will learn how you can utilize this engaging and effective approach to work based learning and transition planning. (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will explain how the process of website development as a unique recovery-based occupational therapy intervention can address Individuals with Disabilities Education Act standards to provide youth with skills, knowledge, and resources to be empowered self-advocates in the transition process.
2.  Participants will describe the process, challenges, and solutions encountered when utilizing web-based technologies as a rehabilitation intervention.

Assistive Technology and the IEP
Elizabeth Littlefield, M.Ed., Special Education Training Specialist
Candy Tavernier, M.Ed., Community Employment Specialist
Regional Special Education Technical Assistance Support Center
Session Description:  The Individual Education Program (IEP) is the cornerstone of the special education process in NY.  The IEP is developed by the Committee on Special Education (CSE) to identify the specific needs of a student and to put into place  supports and services that can move the student toward success and independence.  Part of the responsibility of the CSE is making the determination on whether or not a student requires assistive technology devices and/or services  to make progress toward toward  individualized goals.  If it is determined the student does require AT devices and/or services this information must be captured within the IEP .  In this session, participants will learn about tools that can help with the AT consideration process as well as  learn about where to capture AT needs with the IEP document to help ensure that students have access to the AT supports they need so they can work toward their goals and independence.  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to dispel 3 common myths about AT use and the CSE/IEP process.
2.  Participants will be able to identify 2 tools used as resource in determining a student's  eligibility for AT.
3.  Participants will be able to identify three spots in the IEP where AT considerations should be documented.

Everyday Technology Use for People with Serious Mental Illness
Lynn Gitlow, PhD, ATP, Associate Professor, Ithaca College
David Merlo, MS, COTA, CAT, CPRP; Director of OTA Program, Bryant & Stratton College
Session Description:  In this session participants will learn about research describing how people with mental illness use, and want to use, everyday technology to help with the cognitive disabilities that result from mental illness. Different strategies and intervention options to increase the likelihood of good fit between the individual and technology will be presented.  (AOTA CE Classification: Category 2 Process; Introductory/Intermediate)
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will describe common psychosocial motor, cognitive, contextual, and environmental barriers which may interfere with AT and everyday technology (EDT) use among individuals with serious mental illness (SMI).
2.  Participants will explain research regarding how people with SMI use EDT.
3.  Participants will list at least three different types of AT and EDT that can be useful to meet the needs of individuals with SMI.
4.  Participants will identify at least 3 effective strategies to increase the likelihood of good fit between the individual and technology.

Promoting Successful Reintegration in Post-Secondary Education for Military Veterans with Service-Related Injuries
Kimberly O’Brien, OTS, Clarkson University
Lisa Tebo, OTD, OTR/L, ATP, Clarkson University
Session Description:  Veterans returning to civilian life often enroll in post-secondary education as they pursue new careers and professional roles, yet, service-related injuries and conditions such as TBI, PTSD or depression can pose significant barriers to their success.  Furthermore, pre-conceived notions about assistive technology and the stigma related to "disability" may make some veterans reluctant to seek assistance.  However, many "mainstream" technologies and readily available apps are available to accommodate a variety of challenges. This presentation will highlight a capstone project in which tech tools were explored, reviewed and made available to vets in the form of a non-threatening and user-friendly online environment.  Selected "top tools" will be shared, which can be beneficial for variety of conditions or settings.
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to describe a variety of challenges faced by individuals with disabilities or health conditions entering post-secondary education.
2.  Participants will be able to relate the justification for using mainstream and readily-available technology to support individuals in post-secondary education.
3.  Participants will identify at least 5 readily available technology tools that can be used to support by clients with a variety of conditions in educational, community, or home settings.

Residential Remodeling for Accessibility
Scott Jones, OTR/L, SCEM, ATP; Jones Solutions
(90 minutes)
Session Description: This presentation will provide therapists with a indepth review of residential home modification options, implementation methods and equipment suggestions.
Learning Objectives:
1.  Participants will be able to restate the 7 principles of Universal Design.
2.  Participants will be able to describe at least 3 common pitfalls in home accessibility assessments.
3.  Participants will be able to describe current techniques and best practice in residential accessibility remodeling.