Groundwater Science Researcher Honored With Award



Shane Rogers, assistant professor of civil & environmental engineering, was recently awarded the McKee Groundwater Protection, Restoration and Sustainable Use Medal from the Water Environment Federation.

The award honors a significant contribution to groundwater science or engineering.

The research article that Rogers was nominated for, "Assessment of Intrinsic Bioremediation of a Coal-Tar-Affected Aquifer Using Two-Dimensional Reactive Transport and Biogeochemical Mass Balance Approach," focuses on expedited site characterization of aquifers contaminated with coal tar compounds at former manufactured gas plants.


Basketball in Barcelona



"It's not everyday that you can travel to one of the greatest countries in the world just to play the game you love," said Clarkson junior Brandon Linton '10.

Linton, an innovation and entrepreneurship major and Clarkson basketball player from East Elmhurst, N.Y., was chosen to play on a USA Athletes International basketball team that traveled to three cities in Spain over a 10-day period this summer.

Chosen upon recommendations from other coaches in the Liberty League, Linton joined a team composed of players from Williams, Green Mountain, Colby and Hobart Colleges.

While in Spain, the team played five games, finishing with a 3-2 record.


Scientist or College Student?

Actually, neither.

First-year student Stephen Wu '12, (iE&M) spent what was supposed to be his last summer before college at college.

Wu was one of six students selected for the Clarkson Honors Program, where students are able to come to campus in the summer before their first year to get a jump start on college and perform original research with a professor.

Working with Associate Dean and Professor of Mechanical & Aeronautical Engineering John Moosbrugger, Wu's research focused on the printing of metal nanoparticles on various substrates using inkjet technology.

The researchers hope to find a way to print on flexible materials, such as medical sensors that are embedded in a person's skin. The research may also lead to cheaper, everyday products with greater versatility because they will not be limited by a flat surface, such as lighting and flat screen displays.

Wu showcased his research at the 10th Annual SURE Conference held on July 31 at Clarkson.




National Recognition



Guinevere M. Strack, a graduate student pursuing her master of science degree in chemistry, was selected to receive a travel award from the American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Biological Chemistry. This award supported her attendance at the ACS national meeting in Philadelphia in August.

Strack has been working as a research assistant with Professor Evgeny Katz on a project related to biomolecular computing. This research studies biochemical mimicking of computing operations/devices using enzyme-based systems and their coupling with "smart" signal-responsive materials. Strack formulated her results into three papers, which were recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the Journal of Physical Chemistry B, and ChemBioChem.