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December Newsletter: Page 5

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Clarkson University Student Makes Discovery during Internship 

A chemical engineering major, Lindsay Cannistra (student of CAMP Professor Selma Mededovic) served as a summer intern at Indium Corporation. She tackled a problem that had stumped the company’s researchers, and found a way to extract indium metal from what previously was a waste product. This was exciting because indium -- which is used to manufacture popular products such as flat-panel displays -- is an excellent material for reuse. The Indium Corporation, which has its headquarters in Clinton, New York, is committed to the development of ways to recover or recycle it.

Cannistra

Clarkson University chemical engineering major Lindsay Cannistra was a summer intern at the Indium Corporation. She tackled a problem that had stumped the company’s researchers, and found a way to extract indium metal from what previously was a waste product. From left:  Lindsay Cannistra and her teacher, Associate Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Selma Mededovic.

Lindsay’s project was to come up with a way to extract indium metal from plastic, so she relied on her training from Clarkson and her love of science to achieve her goal.  While it's unusual for a college intern to make a discovery as beneficial as Cannistra's, it doesn't surprise her teacher, Associate Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Selma Mededovic.

“I had her in two classes, first as a sophomore in chemical engineering. I knew then she'd do very well. She really stood out. She's a top student in general,” Mededovic says. “She also excelled in thermodynamics, which is a very challenging class. Lindsay clearly is going to be a great engineer and researcher.”

Professor Goodarz Ahmadi’s Work Involves Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs

CO2

Figure 4: Variation of pressure in a rock fracture. The 3D geometry of the fracture was obtained using a CT scan and the flow computation was done with ANSYS-Fluent Code.

Carbon dioxide sequestration is expected to be a key component of power generation in the near future. While geological sequestration appears to be a promising approach, the nature of carbon dioxide flow into brine saturated porous reservoirs is not fully understood. Clarkson Distinguished Professor & Robert R. Hill Professor Goodarz Ahmadi has spent his six months sabbatical leave at the National Energy Technology Laboratory, of the US Department of Energy, working on carbon dioxide sequestration in geological formation. In particular, he was involved with computational modeling of gas-liquid two phase flows in porous media as well as in rock fractures. See Figure 4.  It was found that the flow interface is highly fractal and the amount of carbon dioxide that can be sequestered in geological formation will vary with the operation parameters of the plant. In addition to analyzing multiphase flows in porous media and rock fractures, he examined the associated deformation of rock fractures during the geological sequestration process. A series of initial studies was also done on proppant transport in rock fractures.